FAQ

Can Sleeprate help me?

Sleeprate can help people with a variety of sleep-related complaints such as difficulties falling asleep, maintaining sound sleep, waking up non-refreshed, being tired/nonproductive, or being moody during the day.

 

If you experience some of the above frustrating issues, know that you are not alone, as more than half of the world population is affected by at least one of them. Sleeprate can help you sort it out and improve your nights and days. With Sleeprate you can track your nights and get a detailed and accurate picture of your sleep trends and habits. This alone may help fix some of the more straightforward sleep-damaging habits.

 

If you feel you are struggling with one of the aforementioned problems and need help, Sleeprate has an efficient Sleep Improvement Program offered. The program starts with a week of assessment, to detect your sleep problems, and includes gathering some important general information regarding your sleep using a few questionnaires, and also an opportunity to get detailed data regarding your nightly/daily sleep-related problems by tracking your nights.

At the end of a 7 day period, enough data are gathered to offer you a detailed report of the detected problems and to provide the basic information needed to start tailoring a sleep improvement program for you.

The program runs in weekly cycles based on CBT-I protocols that aim at rebooting your sleep by helping to change sleep damaging routines and offers tools designed to reframe your sleep habits, beliefs and environment as needed. Following instructions that guide you to change ways you’ve been approaching your sleep for a long time is not easy.

 

Changing old habits may be difficult, yet Sleeprate is your companion as it continues to look into your sleep and the efforts you are making to improve it, and offers support along the way.

Each week you get a report on how the program is going, and what are your sleep retraining challenges for the next 7 days. New tools including mindfulness, relaxation, sleep knowledge are added to your nightstand too.

You can follow the program at your own pace, and usually, the results start coming slowly, but the effort is worth it as within 4-12 weeks you may reach your sleep goals of:

  • Falling Asleep Faster
  • Reducing Night Awakenings
  • Waking Up Refreshed
  • Improving Your Health
  • Improving Mood and Social Relationships
  • Improving Your Performance

 

If sleep is an issue for you, you’re not alone. Over 50% of the population suffers from sleep deprivation or poor sleep. Sleeprate brings wellness to your nights and improves your days.

 

Sleeprate is a trusted sleep companion app that combines evaluation and individually tailored e-coaching with reliable and accurate sleep tracking, all into a single user-friendly mobile application.

 

To find out more about the Sleeprate app, click here

Learn the Sleeprate Language

If you are using the Sleeprate app, the terms below will help you learn more about the terminology used in the app.

Awakenings

The total time spent awake during the night after initially falling asleep.

Bedtime

The time when the recording starts: this is the time when the “Start” button is pressed with the intention of going to sleep.

Daily Data

This screen displays the sleep data scores available from a single sleep session.

Daily View

Presents graphic and numeric summaries of your sleep, including objectively measured sleep structure and stages when available, and sleep-related data for a period of 24 hours.

Data

Allows viewing your sleep and relevant sleep-related daytime data in 24 hours segments ( called daily view) and in their time-dependent context ( time view)

Daytime Stress Level

Your personal rating of your stress during the preceding day.

Deep Sleep

The percentage of deep sleep between falling asleep and waking up.

Duration of Sleep

The total time spent sleeping; this excludes the time it took to fall asleep and the time spent awake during the night.

Early Morning Awakening (EMA)

An earlier-than-expected morning awakening.

Efficiency

The percentage of time spent asleep out of the time between ”Bedtime” and “Wake up”, that represents the intended sleep time.

Environmental Noises

Sound recordings of noises detected during the night.

Fall Asleep

The time it takes to fall asleep.

Heart Rate Monitor

To get more accurate results we recommend you use a Sleeprate-supported heart or wearable device with or without heart rate variability capabilities.

Looking for a tracking device? Get up to 20% discount on a Garmin wearable

Intended Wake-Up Time

The time the alarm clock is set and indicates the scheduled wake-up time.

Light Sleep

The percentage of light sleep between falling asleep and waking up.

Nap Duration

The reported nap time during the preceding day.

Night Stress

A measure of the overall stress tracked during your nighttime recording. Available only for wearables with instantaneous heart rate. This is an individually determined score that may change, with higher values indicating higher stress.

REM Sleep

The percentage of REM sleep between falling asleep and waking up times.

Sleep Assessment

The Assessment runs over the first 7 consecutive days of the program, includes a few questionnaires and as many as possible nights tracked, but not less than 3. It allows for gathering sufficient data to detect your sleep deficiencies, understand their causes and design ways to start building a personalized sleep-improving program.

Sleep Disruptions

The average hourly number of brief and unnoticed intrusions of wakefulness into sleep.

Sleep Improvement Plan

The Sleeprate app will guide you step-by-step and at your own pace through a series of sleep-improvement training challenges, on a path to better sleep and well-being.

Sleep Satisfaction

Your personal rating of the sleep quality when you wake up in the morning.

Smart Alarm

****COMING SOON**** This feature provides a flexible wake-up time (within a 20-minute window) to ensure that you wake up at the optimal moment during your sleep cycle. Note that this is available only when certain wearable devices are used to track sleep.

Snore

****COMING SOON**** Recordings of snoring detected in the bedroom during the night.

Stress Day Rating

Your rating regarding daytime stress.

Time View

Presents graphic and numeric summaries of your sleep, including objectively measured sleep structure and stages when available, and sleep-related data for multiple days with zoom in and zoom out capabilities. These features allow to review sleep trends of time.

Total Time in Bed

The time-lapse between going to bed at night and getting up in the morning.

Track My Sleep

This is how your sleep is tracked to catch the complexity of this important component of your life. In fact you provide valuable information that can’t be captured accurately otherwise. First you answer a few questions about your day. Then when ready for sleep you start tracking your sleep. To accurately measure your time falling asleep, we recommend to start tracking when not before you are going to bed with the intention to sleep. You can use an activity or fitness monitor to obtain objective-measured rof your sleep.  Using the app alone, without a wearable, allows valuable insights into your sleep quality and quantity , habits that influence your sleep and daytime feelings related to sleep, such as sleepiness, mood or stress. We recommend you answer the questions as your day winds down, that way all that is left to do when you get in bed is click on the “Start Tracking” button.

Wake

The percentage of awake time during the night. This includes the time it took to fall asleep and the time spent awake during the night.

What plan is right for me?

The Sleeprate app includes sleep tracking, sleep assessment and CBT-I coaching with a plan to achieve your desired sleep-life balance.

 

The right plan for you depends on your sleep goals. Sleeprate can help you formulate and reach those goals.

 

To read more, click here.

 

How do I know if the Sleeprate results are accurate?

Sleeprate uses validated algorithms to provide sleep analysis regarding falling asleep time, sleep efficiency, sleep stages, sleep disruption, and sleep-related stress. The details provided depend on the data collected by available wearables (heart rate, movement). Subjective or perceived sleep data are also required. The reason for this is simple: while we are asleep, we are disconnected from the environment, and our memory is quite impaired. Thus, we do not always feel that the measured data are in line with our perception of the time it took us to fall asleep, or for how long we were awake at night. We may remember we were checking the time, or that we were wide awake at night, however, we do not have an accurate estimation of time asleep.

 

Usually, people who do not have sleep problems believe they slept longer than they really did, and people who have sleep issues tend to perceive their time spent awake longer than the measured wakefulness time. Some discrepancies may be due to limitations/errors in measurement, more so when there are technical issues causing data loss. Understanding the origin of the discrepancies between our feeling regarding sleep and the objective metrics is important, as this provides valuable information on the sleep problems experienced and helps with solving them.

 

If the results you get are not what you were expecting, or if you have any problems with the sleep analysis, be sure to let us know so we can investigate the issues and find out what corrections might be needed.

How Much Sleep Do I Need?

There is no standard for the amount of sleep an individual requires. Each person is unique. In simple terms, you need enough sleep to avoid drowsiness and to perform at optimal efficiency during the day. That need changes with age, so what works best in one stage of your life may not be appropriate for another. At the extremes of a distribution across large populations are normal people who need as little as 4 hours or as much as 12 hours.

A majority of people do very well with 7½ to 8 hours of sleep. But use those numbers only as a starting point until you determine if that range is appropriate for you. Although you can ignore your body’s need for a certain amount of rest through motivation and sheer force of will, doing so isn’t conducive to good health or a vibrant existence.

Our “always on” culture has permeated traditional barriers between work time, family time, playtime, and rest. Sometimes we’re trying to do two or three things at once; or we’re struggling to meet an unnatural (and occasionally unrealistic) expansion of obligations. The result is that more of us are carrying sleep debts or adding to them faster than ever before. Sleeping late on the weekends may seem to help, but in fact it’s only paying interest on the debt, so to speak.

Sleep deprivation can have serious consequences for mental and physical health.

You cannot perceive, in precise terms, how much sleep you actually need. The only way of evaluating that in a scientific manner is to sleep for several nights without wakeup or other constraints. After the sleep debt is replenished, your natural need for sleep will take over and yield an accurate duration.

If you suspect you’re not getting enough sleep, you may need to investigate further by using the SleepRate solution (see below) or by a visiting your physician for professional evaluation.

How Will SleepRate Help You?

SleepRate measures and reports the duration and efficiency of sleep you receive. If you feel you aren’t getting enough restorative sleep, SleepRate will make personalized recommendations to help you sleep better. 

What should I ask my doctor?

What should I ask my doctor when I feel that my sleep is poor or I can’t sleep at night?

Try to be concise and clear. State very briefly what are your problems regarding your sleep, such as: long time to fall asleep, waking up frequently at night, waking as after a sleepless night. You may want to ask if the problem may be connected to some other health problems you might have or with any medication you are taking. Do not ask for sleeping pills, but ask if you should consult a sleep specialist or visit a sleep clinic and what would be the costs related to this. Then you can ask about recommended treatments for your problem.

In response, your doctor should inquire about your sleep-wake usual schedule, including when you go to bed, how long it takes you to fall asleep, when you wake up in the morning, napping during the day. The doctor could also ask for information regarding sleep environment, how preoccupied are you about your sleep complaints, snoring, movement during sleep, caffeine and alcohol consumption, working schedule and type of job, general health, nutrition and exercise habits, daytime sleepiness and mood.

Based on this sleep and medical short history, your doctor may suggest a treatment, and may recommend further workup, including seeing a specialist.

How can SleepRate help?

SleepRate lets you measure your sleep structure, awakenings, arousal index and sleep times. You can bring the results to your doctors for further considerations.

Sleep Medication

Over the counter sleeping aids

Many people use over the counter sleeping aids when having difficulties falling asleep.

Such sleeping aids may be used occasionally, but on a regular basis it is preferable to stick to healthy sleep habits, rather than use any medication.
There are many over the counter medications. Most are antihistamines (like Benadryl, Unisom) and their sedative effect is actually a side effect of a medication aimed originally as an anti-allergy one. Thus, they can cause daytime drowsiness, dry mouth, dizziness and memory problems.
In addition, plant extracts such as Valerian may be used. Their influence differs individually, sometimes they help falling asleep, but they also can cause irritability, abdominal discomfort, and cardiac issues.

Melatonin, a naturally occurring hormone related to the normal regulation of the sleep-wake cycle is also used as an over the counter sedative.

Prescription Sleeping Pills

Falling asleep difficulties and/or difficulties to maintain sleep across the night are very frequent. About 10% of the general population suffers from chronic sleep problems and as many as 30-50% of people have at some time or another in their lives sleep related concerns. The healthy way to deal with these problems, if they are not connected to an underlying health problem such as Obstructive Sleep Apnea or a mood disorder, is to try and adhere to a regular sleep schedule, and implement all sleep hygiene requirements. Sometimes, one can use for a short time a sleeping pill, provided it is prescribed by a physician, preferably a sleep expert.

When asking a physician to help you sleep better, fall asleep faster or stay asleep for an entire night, the doctor will make some inquiries regarding your general health as well as your sleep habits and changes in lifestyle or distressing vents. When needed, some tests may be ordered to rule out any underling medical cause to the sleep disturbance. Then a suitable sleep medication may be prescribed for a period of around two weeks. Additional steps may be needed to improve sleep.

Sleeping pills in general carry the risk of developing dependence and tolerance when used over prolonged periods of time. Newer compounds have less such effects, but they can cause liver or kidney problems as well as mood changes, and more.

Melatonin

Melatonin is a hormone secreted by the pineal gland, a small structure in our brains that receives its input regarding light and dark in the environment via the optic pathways originating in the eyes. The secretion starts in the late evening, is maximal around 3-4 am, and is suppressed during daylight. Melatonin is a factor in the sleep-wake cycle regulation.

It has been used for decades as an aid in treating jet lag and other sleep-wake cycle disorders. Research indicates that its use is beneficial. However, since in the US melatonin is sold as a food additive, its efficiency and side effects have not been checked in extensive clinical trials. Its usage is broad and no severe side effecthave been documented. One has to be aware of possible drug interaction that may exist. When having any health problem that requires medication, it is advised to consult a doctor before taking Melatonin. It is recommended to purchase a product of a known lab to avoid using ineffective or contaminated Melatonin.

How can SleepRate help?

SleepRate is able to detect sleep schedule patterns and sleep structure. Based on these measurements, SleepRate can recommend how to make changes to improve sleep and reduce the need for sleeping aids/pills/medication.

How much sleep is enough?

How Much Sleep Do You Need?

There is no standard for the amount of sleep an individual requires. Each person is unique. In simple terms, you need enough sleep to avoid drowsiness and to perform at peak efficiency during the day. That need changes with age, so what works best in one stage of your life may not be appropriate for another. At the extremes of a distribution across large populations are normal people who need as little as 4 hours or as much as 12 hours.

A majority of people do very well with 7 ½ to 8 hours of sleep. But use those numbers as a starting point until you determine if that range is appropriate for you. Although you can ignore your body’s need for a certain amount of rest through motivation and sheer force of will, doing so isn’t conducive to good health or a vibrant existence.

Our “always on” culture has permeated traditional barriers between work time, family time, playtime and rest. Sometimes we’re trying to do two or three things at once; or we’re struggling to meet an unnatural (and occasionally unrealistic) expansion of obligations. The result is that more of us are carrying sleep debts or adding to them faster than ever before. Sleeping late on the weekends may seem to help, but in fact it’s only paying interest on the debt, so to speak.

Sleep deprivation can have serious consequences for mental and physical health.

You cannot perceive, in precise terms, how much sleep you actually need. The only way of evaluating that in a scientific manner is to sleep for several nights without wakeup or other constraints. After the sleep debt is replenished, your natural need for sleep will take over and yield an accurate duration.

If you suspect you’re not getting enough sleep, you may need to investigate further by using the SleepRate solution (see below) or by a visiting your physician for professional evaluation.

How Will SleepRate Help You?

SleepRate measures and reports the quantity and quality of sleep you receive. If you feel you aren’t getting enough restorative sleep, SleepRate will make personalized recommendations to help you sleep better. If SleepRate suspects that a medical condition is impacting your sleep, it will recommend a visit to a physician.

Respiratory Sleep Disorders

A person’s breathing control while awake is both automatic and voluntary. During sleep the voluntary mechanism disappears and respiration is on “autopilot”. At the same time, the absence of wake-state stimuli, normal reduction in muscle tone and reduced lung volume in a recumbent position create conditions that can contribute to sleep-related respiratory disturbances. Normal respiration patterns differ depending on the sleep stage: They are very regular during stages of non-REM deep sleep, but can be irregular during sleep onset and REM sleep.

Normal breathing during sleep should be relatively quiet. This means that fresh air enters the lungs without impediments several times per minute, thus maintaining the body’s metabolic requirements during sleep.

Loud respiratory noise during sleep may indicate the presence of a respiratory disorder. The first clue that something might be wrong is snoring during sleep. This may signal a temporary narrowing or blockage of the upper airways due to relaxation of the airway muscles and pressure from surrounding tissue while in a recumbent position. This narrowing leads to a reduction of air inflow to the lungs called sleep hypopnea, while a complete blockage of those airways is called sleep apnea. Frequently both are described as a single condition called obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome.

Snoring is always due to some degree of narrowing in the upper airways, but it doesn’t necessarily indicate full-blown obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome. But a person who snores should, without question, follow up with a physician due to possible health risks.

Another less common breathing problem is known as central sleep apnea. This condition is characterized by a temporary, sometimes cyclic lack of respiratory drive that indicates an absence of proper signaling from the brain to the respiratory system. During sleep, the body “forgets” to breathe for abnormally long periods of time, resulting in irregular respiration.

These disorders interfere with sleep quality and cause daytime sleepiness, performance issues and serious health problems such as hypertension, cardiovascular issues or strokes. Fortunately, effective treatments are available from medical professionals that can improve, to a large degree, a sufferer’s quality of life.

How Will SleepRate Help You?

Use SleepRate for a few days to identify sleep-wake patterns and to measure sleep duration, efficiency and structure. If those measurements suggest a condition that warrants further investigation, you’ll be prompted to consult a physician for an in-depth sleep evaluation.

Find out more about SleepRate. Or, if you’re ready to purchase a SleepRate package, start here.

FAQ

SleepRate Home Page

Over-the-Counter Sleeping Aids

People frequently use over-the-counter (OTC) sleep medications when they have difficulty falling asleep. Those medications can be useful when taken occasionally, but ongoing sleep challenges require an adherence to healthy sleep habits rather than the long-term use of medication.

Many OTC medications are available for sleep. Most are antihistamines (e.g., Benadryl, Unisom). Their sedative properties are actually a side effect of medications originally intended for control of hay fever and other allergies. Unwanted side effects may include daytime drowsiness, dry mouth, dizziness and memory problems.

A plant extract such as valerian may also be used. Its efficacy varies by individual, but sometimes it works well as a sleep aid. Unwanted side effects may include irritability, abdominal discomfort and cardiac problems.

Melatonin, a naturally occurring hormone that regulates sleep-wake cycles, is used often as an OTC sedative.

How Will SleepRate Help You?

Use SleepRate for a few days to identify sleep-wake patterns and to measure sleep duration, efficiency and structure. It will provide you with personalized advice on how to improve your sleep.

Learn more about SleepRate. Or, if you’re ready to purchase a SleepRate package, start here.

FAQ

FAQ

Sleep and Stress

Epidemiological studies indicate that throughout the previous century and, mostly during the last decades, there is a clear decline in sleep time and increasing anxiety within the populations living in the developed countries. Those two tendencies are interconnected: sleep deprivation increases an individual’s “stress” and anxiety is related to difficulties falling asleep or maintaining a continuous and refreshing sleep.
There are many measures for stress reduction, mostly subjective, as well as some invasive ones, involving blood tests to assess certain hormone levels. Stress depends on the activity of the involuntary or autonomic nervous system, the part of our nervous system that is active all the time in the background and is taking care of all the automatic activities that sustain life, such as breathing, rhythm and intensity of the heart’s beats, body temperature regulation, sweating, digestion, blood flow and more.

Each heart contraction occurs as a result of the autonomic nervous system modulating the Heart Rate, according to the body’s needs and emotional and cognitive activities. This system has two branches. One of them enhances heart activity, being in charge of making the organism ready to react, a “fight and flight” reaction, obviously connected to danger, increased stress, readiness to act. The other branch is in charge of the opposite, namely, slowing down, relaxation, restoration, in a way a “rest and digest” kind of activity. These two branches, known as the sympathetic and parasympathetic parts, respectively, of the autonomic nervous system, act normally in a continuous balance, aiming to keep the organism safe and performing.

How can SleepRate help?

SleepRate measures the heart rate variation and can calculate a stress level from this signal. By evaluation of stress levels across many nights, you can see trends in stress, and try different stress relieving measures or strategies and follow up their results.

Sleep disorders

Along human history the mystery of sleep preoccupied the minds and souls of great philosophers and thinkers, poets and artists. The entire understandings regarding sleep were based on observation. Some observations serve as the basis for a branch of the medical science: Sleep Medicine. This relatively new field deals with the overlooked part of human life, sleep time, which represents grossly one third of our lives. People may be aware of how daily events and troubles impact their nights, but they are not necessarily aware of the opposite, how unnoticed sleep problems can influence their whole life including health, physical and mental performance, mood. Thus Sleep Medicine deals with sleep disorders.
Sleep disorders can be the result of an illness that is not directly the result of a faulty sleep- related function. For instance, any disease causing pain, be it an ear infection, tooth pain, or arthritis, may cause very significant sleep problems. Mood disorders, such as increased anxiety, can result in difficulty falling asleep; depression can result in prolonged sleep, but also in early awakenings.

Other sleep disorders originate within sleep itself. The most prevalent one is the Obstructive Sleep Apnea-Hypopnea Syndrome or Sleep Related Breathing Disorder. Others examples are Narcolepsy, REM Behavior Sleep Disorder, Periodic Limb Movement of Sleep.

1. Sleep related breathing disorders

Human muscles lower their level of basic activity during sleep; moreover, during REM sleep their activity is almost completely shut down. The decrease in the muscular activity level affects also the upper airways, which become naturally floppy during sleep, at a time when body position is recumbent. These changes cause the air passages to get narrower, so the inspiration becomes more difficult, resulting in different degrees of compromise of the air inflow. The easiest form is just narrowing, which causes turbulence of the airflow that makes the surrounding soft tissues, such as the soft palate, vibrate and thus produce the bothering snoring sound. As the narrowing of the passages becomes more accentuated, the airflow is compromised and sometimes even stops, causing a hypopnea (partial decrease in airflow) or an apnea (airflow cessation). The resulting respiratory events end when the muscles increase their tone and the airways reopen and allow breathing in. For this to happen, the sleep is shortly interrupted by a short arousal lasting for a few seconds. This arousal is so short that one does not remember it, however when there are many respiratory events that end with an arousal, sleep becomes fragmented. This can lead to increased daytime sleepiness and other medical complications such as hypertension.

Respiratory events are related not only to sleep fragmentation;they are also accompanied by decrease in blood oxygenation, sometimes increase in the levels of carbon dioxide, and increased stress to the cardiovascular system. Thus sleep related breathing disorders have huge impact on health, being causally related to hypertension and other cardiac problems. The cognitive function may be affected, and so can be mood and memory. Another bothering effect is daytime sleepiness.

Breathing related sleep disorder, Obstructive Sleep Apnea-Hypopnea (OSA) syndrome, is prevalent. 4-10% of the population has OSAS and the prevalence increases with age. The disorder is treatable, and when effectively treated, the consequences can be reversed. The great majority (about 75%) of sufferers, however, remain undiagnosed, and thus untreated.

2. Snoring

Snoring occurs when there is a narrowing of the airways during sleep, causing turbulence of the airflow and vibration of the soft tissue in the way, the soft palate, that make the well-known noise. The phenomenon is very frequent, a quarter to more than half the population snore sometimes or habitually, while supine or in every position. It bothers the bed partners. For some there is only snoring (primary snoring), while for others it is a sign of Obstructive Sleep Apnea. Snoring is also treatable, but first one has to rule out the coexistence of Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

When to see your doctor about your snoring, you should report whether:
• You wake up suddenly gasping on a snort at night and fall asleep almost instantaneously after this happens
• You snore so loud that your bed partner gets very annoyed and can’t sleep
• Your throat is dry and painful at night
• Your wake up non refreshed

3. Periodic limb movement in sleep

not so rare sleep disorder of unexplained etiology. The manifestation of this disorder consists of periodic jerks of the legs and or sometimes upper limbs. The jerks may be as subtle as a toe twitch, or as significant as a limb movement lasting around a couple of seconds and recurring every 20 to 60 seconds during light sleep mainly, and continuing for as long as an hour at times. The cause remains unknown; it always accompanies Restless Leg Syndrome, but can be present on its own. It may coexist with other disorders, Obstructive Sleep Apnea included. It may be connected with many short arousals that cause sleep fragmentation and non-refreshing sleep, and it may disturb the sleep of the bed partner. The prevalence increases with age. Sometimes it is connected to iron depletion and treating iron deficiency anemia can improve the symptoms. There are additional medical remedies available and prescribed by sleep physicians or neurologists.

4. Narcolepsy

A sleep disorder that can manifest sometimes as extreme daytime sleepiness and poor sleep, or in its classical form as a tetrad including excessive daytime sleepiness with irresistible napping tendency, hallucinations upon falling asleep, sleep paralysis, and cataplexy. Cataplexy is a sudden partial or total loss of muscle tone caused by a sudden emotion, usually positive, typically laughing. The patient may fall down while being completely conscious, and then unable to move or talk. The disease may be sporadic or may have a genetic background uncovered a few years ago*. Narcolpesy is treated behaviorally with planned naps and symptomatically, using vigilance promoting medications and drugs that can relieve catalepsy. It is a disabling disorder and it goes on for life.

5. Insomnia

Insomnia is defined as complaint of difficulty falling asleep and/or of maintaining sleep, usually leading to the subjective feeling of poor sleep quality and waking up non-refreshed. The disorder is prevalent, the frequency increases with age, and generally is higher in women. Insomnia has important negative consequences, including fatigue, irritability, cognitive problems and memory issues. Population surveys indicate that most Insomnia patients are reluctant to consult their doctor with regard to their sleep problem. Insomnia may be frequent and occur almost on a nightly basis, or can have an intermittent course. The disorder can be primary or caused by a stressful life event, shift work or frequent travel across time zones. Insomnia can be present as a stand-alone disorder or it can coexist with other sleep disorders, such as Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Periodic Limb Movement of Sleep, or it may result from a medical problem, such as arthritis, acute or chronic pain, heart failure, liver disease, diabetes and more, or anxiety and mood disorders. The consequences are extensive, including absenteeism, poor job performance, social problems, inattention, increased accident tendency and more. Usually people try different kind of self administered remedies, when the best approach would be to consult a professional.

The doctor’s approach is to take a proper medical and sleep history, order tests if necessary rule out underlying medical problems, and refer to specific Insomnia treatment when no underlying disease is detected.

The treatment consists mostly of behavioral and cognitive therapy, which have been proved to be most efficient and with long lasting effects. These therapies include keeping a very regular sleep-wake schedule, sticking to sleep hygiene requirements, sleep restriction, stimulus control, stress reduction and certain relaxation procedures. The therapy may include a short course of prescription sleeping pills at the beginning. It is recommended to avoid self-medication with alcohol or other over the counter remedies. A healthy life style including a regular sleep schedule, sleep routine, moderate exercise to keep fitness, avoiding coffee and caffeine-containing foods or beverages, avoiding alcohol at bed time, are all required in order to maintain good night’s sleep in those who suffer from Insomnia.

How can SleepRate help?

SleepRate provides sleep macrostructure and microstructure assessment as well as accurate sleep time, difficulties with falling asleep and sleep-wake schedule

Based on the sleep assessment above, if there is suspicion for a sleep disorder a more in depth sleep study should be performed. If not, treatment for Insomnia, CBTI, relaxation, smart wake up and specific notification can help self-improvement of your sleep.

The importance of a good night’s sleep

Sleep is vital: without both an adequate time asleep and a good quality sleep, human health, performance and well being are negatively affected.

The adequate sleep time changes with age and is individually predetermined. Humans can overcome their sleep needs if they are motivated enough to do so. This motivation originates in work demands that require long commuting times, sometimes shift work, increasing performance demands. This motivation is served well by the artificial light which makes possible twenty four hours of activity a day. In addition, the media and internet add grounds to extend the wakefulness into the late night time, when people have a natural drive to sleep. Thus in the seventies of the previous century, people spent 2 hours less asleep on average than before the invention of the electric bulb by Edison.

Research shows that life expectancy decreases when human sleep less than their physiological needs. Less sleep causes increased stress and irritability, decreased cognitive performance, memory issues and low mood. Heart diseases may be connected to sleep loss. There is increasing evidence that type II diabetes, overweight, and obesity are connected to the ever growing sleep debt in the Western World. When people are awake during extended time intervals they were supposed to sleep, they eat out of their normal eating times, the caloric intake is increased without even noticing it, and the metabolic balance is disturbed. Also, sleep deprivation causes sleepiness, which in turn triggers a reduction in physical activity that is added to the inactivity connected to the extended time spent near different types of keyboards and remote control devices!
As time spent asleep is reduced, sleepiness gains terrain and the number of inattention spells increases. Many traffic accidents, and as many as 25% of the serious accidents, can be traced back to lack of adequate sleep. Research indicates clearly that sleep loss is as bad for drivers as alcohol intoxication .

How can SleepRate help?

SleepRate allows assessment of sleep time and structure over extended time periods.
If poor sleep structure and duration are detected, SleepRate emphasizes the failure and helps to correct it.

Importance of sleep

What is Sleep?

Sleep is both universal and fascinating. Although we spend a third of our lives sleeping, scientists don’t fully understand its nature and purpose. The most precise definition available at this time is descriptive: It’s a natural behavioral state (another is wakefulness) governed by the nervous system that is characterized by perceptual disengagement and motor inactivity. The state is cyclical and reversible without intervention. Unlike a coma – a total lack of consciousness – sleep is actually a semi-conscious state. This means that a minimal level of environmental awareness allows an individual to react to certain triggers. For example, a sleeping mother will hear her crying baby; people wake up when hearing their name called; or danger such as a fire or an attack is present or imminent.

We know that sleep has a restorative function and a major impact on physical health, cognitive performance and mood stability. It seems to be as important as air, food and water for sustaining life. Resting while awake is not a substitute for sleep.

Sleep is a dynamic process with an active brain that changes its state many times each night during different stages of sleep and through sleep cycles.

Most animalssleep, but timing and duration vary tremendously across species. We’re not sure why.

Why Do We Need to Sleep?

Here’s the most simplistic answer: We need to sleep to avoid feeling sleepy.

Researchers have illustrated this need with a simple experiment that shows the impact of sleep debt. When healthy people are forced to stay awake continuously for one or two days, their waking state is eventually interrupted by short episodes of involuntary sleep. Test subjects are incapable of avoiding them. Moreover, other adverse consequences can be observed at the same time:

  • declining cognitive performance
  • disrupted biological rhythms
  • undesirable metabolic changes (e.g., hormone levels)

Scientists have observed, over longer periods of time, that a chronic lack of sleep:

  • may cause weight gain
  • adversely impacts learning and memory
  • reduces immunity
  • shortens lifespans

Sleep deprivation is a major public health concern in many countries. One example everyone knows about: accidents caused by sleepy drivers.

On the other hand, quality sleep replenishes the body and mind in several ways. For example, sleep plays a crucial role in children’s growth and development. That’s one reason why young ones need more sleep than adults. Memory consolidation occurs during sleep. Body reserves and energy levels are restored while sleeping.

Interestingly, too much sleep is just as bad as too little sleep.

How much sleep someone needs is difficult to answer precisely, though statistically a majority of people need 7 ½ to 8 hours.

How Will SleepRate Help You?

SleepRate measures and reports the quantity and quality of sleep you receive. If you feel you aren’t getting enough restorative sleep, SleepRate will make personalized recommendations to help you sleep better. If SleepRate suspects that a medical condition is impacting your sleep, it will recommend a visit to a physician.

Find out more about SleepRate. Or, if you’re ready to purchase a SleepRate package, start here.

SleepRate Home Page

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