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Glossary

Actual Wake Up-TimeSleepRate Term*

The time you press the “end sleep tracking”, indicating the real time you woke up and ended your night sleep session.

Advanced sleep phase syndrome (ASPS)

A tendency to fall asleep too early and wake up too soon relative to conventional schedules and personal needs.

Apnea

The lack of airflow through the nose and mouth for at least 10 seconds.

Apnea-hypopnea index (AHI)

The average number of apneas and hypopneas per hour of sleep.

Arousal

A sudden and brief (3-15 seconds) awakening from sleep.

Arousal IndexSleepRate Term*

The average hourly number of brief and unnoticed intrusions of wakefulness into sleep.

BedtimeSleepRate Term*

The time when the the recording starts: this is the time when the start button is pressed with the intention of going to sleep.

Biological Clocks

Many human functions are cyclical because they are regulated by inner oscillators called biological clocks. One of the most apparent clocks controls the sleep-wake cycle. It’s located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the brain and has a period between 24 and 25 hours.

This means that, absent other cues and influences (light, schedules, etc.), humans would fall asleep and wake up an hour later each day. Of course, people normally live within a conventional 24-hour recurring pattern known as a circadian rhythm.

Light plays a big role in keeping people on track: Bright illumination as perceived by the eyes sends signals to the SCN to reset the sleep-wake cycle to 24 hours. The pineal gland influences the SCN via production of a hormone called melatonin. Light inhibits the secretion of melatonin, while darkness stimulates it. Melatonin’s presence is an indicator for – and may modulate – the sleep-wake cycle.

Oral doses of melatonin may be used to reset an inner clock that is out of sync with the environment. For example, people who suffer from jet lag when they travel across time zones can use melatonin to reset their inner clock to match the destination’s normal schedule.

How Will SleepRate Help You?

Use SleepRate for a few days to identify sleep-wake patterns and to detect a biological clock that is slow, fast or simply abnormal. If an out-of-sync clock is found, SleepRate recommends ways of dealing with it. It also offers implementation assistance.

Learn more about SleepRate. Or, if you’re ready to purchase a SleepRate package, start here.

Sleep Science Table of Contents

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Cataplexy

A sudden loss of muscle tone (a group of muscles or all antigravity muscles) caused by emotional triggers (e.g., laughter, fear, surprise). It is a characteristic of narcolepsy.

Central Apnea

A form of apnea associated with the lack of respiratory movement due to improper signaling from the brain to the respiratory system.

Circadian Sleep Disorders

Many human physiological functions have a cyclical nature. Cycles with 24-hour patterns are called circadian rhythms. For example, most people are hungry or feel sleepy at the same times each day. A circadian sleep disorder is a disruption of a sleep-wake circadian pattern that may prevent people from meeting daytime obligations or cause daytime sleepiness.

A normal sleep-wake circadian rhythm is an inner clock that awakens us in the morning, keeps us awake during the day, and allows us to fall asleep at night. Most people maintain a regular schedule through a 24-hour day without difficulty.

Some individuals have inner clocks that are slightly misaligned with conventional schedules. So-called night owls have a tendency to stay up late and wake up late when unencumbered by a fixed schedule. Larks have the opposite tendency: They prefer to sleep earlier and wake earlier. Owls are more prevalent than larks.

Both tendencies are natural and don’t pose a problem unless they cause sleep deprivation and interference with normal daytime activities (working, socializing, etc.).

Tendencies become disorders when they have adverse consequences for health, mood or daytime performance. Delayed sleep phase syndrome is an inability to fall asleep at a time that allows one to wake up without a struggle to meet daily obligations. Advanced sleep phase syndrome is the opposite problem: An inability to stay awake in the evenings that sacrifices socializing or other fulfilling activities, but waking earlier than normal each morning. Such individuals are valued by their employers because they arrive unusually early each workday; but they often experience loneliness due to absence from typical family or social gatherings.

A complete absence of a normal sleep-wake circadian rhythm is called irregular sleep-wake disorder. People with this rare condition lack a clearly defined 24-hour sleep-wake pattern and thus sleep in a disorganized manner for short periods of time. Continual napping is a way of life.

Free running sleep-wake disorder is associated with a sleep-wake rhythm that is disconnected from environmental cues or conventional day-night schedules. Individuals with this affliction simply follow their inner sleep-wake clock, which is actually closer to 25 hours. As such, they advance their daily sleep period approximately one hour each day.

External schedule changes cause shift work disorder and jet lag. When people cannot reset their inner clocks after a schedule shift, the result is insomnia, sleep deprivation, excessive daytime sleepiness and related performance or health risks.

How Will SleepRate Help You?

SleepRate can track sleep-wake circadian behaviors, detect abnormal patterns and assist you with overcoming problems it uncovers.

Learn more about SleepRate. Or, if you’re ready to purchase a SleepRate package, start here.

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Continuous Sleep

Uninterrupted sleep.

 

Daily ViewSleepRate Term*

This screen displays the relevant sleep data scores available from a single sleep session.

Day Stress RatingSleepRate Term*

Your personal rating of your stress during the preceding day.

Deep SleepSleepRate Term*

The percentage deep sleep between falling asleep and waking up times.

Delayed sleep phase syndrome (DSPS)

A tendency to delay falling asleep and to wake up too late relative to conventional schedules and personal needs.

 

DurationSleepRate Term*

Total time spent sleeping; it excludes the time spent falling asleep and the time spent awake during the night.

Duration of AwakeningsSleepRate Term*

Total time spent awake during the night after initially falling asleep.

Early Awakenings

When a person wakes up early, it’s usually because his/her sleep needs have been met or those needs are reduced. If someone wakes up too early and needs more sleep, but can’t go back to sleep, something is wrong. Sometimes the cause is a mood disorder. Notwithstanding the reason, this kind of difficulty needs attention, evaluation and appropriate management.

How Will SleepRate Help You?

Use SleepRate for a few nights to measure sleep duration and efficiency; and to track sleep-related habits and behaviors. If SleepRate detects a consistent deviation from normal patterns, it recommends that you take action and provides personalized advice to follow.

Learn more about SleepRate. Or, if you’re ready to purchase a SleepRate package, start here.

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Early Morning Awakening (EMA)SleepRate Term*

An earlier-than-expected morning awakening that may also be a sign of depression.

Early Morning Awakening (EMA)

An earlier-than-expected morning awakening that is also a characteristic of depression.

 

Electroencephalogram (EEG)

A recording of electrical activity in the brain.

 

Electromyogram (EMG)

A recording of electrical activity of muscle tissue. In whole-night sleep studies (polysomnography or PSG) electrodes are placed on the skin around the chin.

Electrooculogram (EOG)

A recording of electrical activity resulting from eye movements.

 

Environmental NoisesSleepRate Term*

Recordings of different sound or noise episodes detected during the night.

Falling AsleepSleepRate Term*

The time it takes to fall asleep.

Go To BedSleepRate Term*

This step tracks your sleep. Start by answering a few questions about your day, continues with setting your wake up alarm, and then you are ready to start tracking your sleep. To let us accurately get your falling asleep time, we recommend to start tracking when you really intend to go to sleep, and not before. You may use a SleepRate supported Heart Rate Monitor for more accurate and objectively measured results, or you may use the app alone for snore and noise analysis, as well as keeping track of your subjective sleep insights.

Heart Rate MonitorSleepRate Term*

To get more accurate results we recommend you use a SleepRate supported Heart Rate Monitor.

Currently SleepRate supports the Polar H7 monitor.

Hypnagogic Hallucinations

Vivid imagery while falling asleep; a characteristic of narcolepsy.

 

Hypnagoic

A transition from wakefulness to sleep.

Hypnopompic

A transition from sleep to wakefulness.

 

Hypnopompic Hallucinations

Vivid imagery while awakening from sleep; may accompany narcolepsy.

 

Hypopnea

Measurable reductions of airflow through the nose and mouth.

 

Insomnia

Good sleep implies a consistent ability to fall asleep within a reasonable amount of time; to stay asleep all night; and to wake up refreshed and alert at a time that allows one to meet daily obligations.

Almost everyone has difficulty with sleep at some points in their lives, but those are transitory states and most people return to normal sleep patterns after a short time.

Insomnia is the inability to fall asleep and/or maintain sleep. It’s also a perception of poor sleep quality or a feeling that sleep is not refreshing. The disorder is widespread: Approximately 10% of the general population suffers from chronic insomnia and as many as 30-50% report experiencing it at least once in their lives. The condition becomes more prevalent with age and is more common in women.

The cause may be environmental (e.g., stressful life events, travel across time zones, shift work); related to non-sleep medical problems; or it may coexist with other sleep disorders. Regardless of the cause, the resulting sleep deprivation has adverse impacts on mood, performance and health. Absenteeism may increase. Daytime sleepiness may lead to more accidents. Surveys indicate, surprisingly, that most people who suffer from insomnia do not consult a doctor about their condition.

Examples of specific conditions include:

  • sleep onset insomnia (trouble falling asleep)
  • sleep maintenance insomnia (trouble staying asleep)
  • early morning awakening (waking up too early)

Other health problems (obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea, physical ailments or mood disorders) may cause insomnia and should be addressed before attempting insomnia-specific treatments. Absent such problems, the best way to prevent insomnia is to adhere to the rules of good sleep hygiene and to maintain a healthy lifestyle. If doing these things doesn’t help, treatment options include cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) alone or with short-term medication therapy. A physician (preferably a sleep expert) will provide appropriate guidance.

How Will SleepRate Help You?

SleepRate measures and reports the duration and efficiency of sleep you receive. If you suffer from insomnia, the service will make personalized treatment recommendations to help you sleep better.

Learn more about SleepRate. Or, if you’re ready to purchase a SleepRate package, start here.

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Insufficient SleepSleepRate Term*

A habitual sleep duration shorter than the sleep time needed for a person to perform at his or hers optimal level.

Intended Wake-Up TimeSleepRate Term*

The time the alarm clock is set and indicates the scheduled wake-up time.

Lark/ Advanced Sleep Phase Syndrome/(ASPS)SleepRate Term*

A tendency to fall asleep earlier and wake up sooner than conventional schedules and personal obligations. Otherwise, Sleep structure is normal.

Light SleepSleepRate Term*

The percentage of light sleep  between falling asleep and waking up times.

Loud NoisesSleepRate Term*

Recordings of high intensity sound  or noise detected during the night and that were not connected with awakenings from sleep.

Maintenance of Wakefulness Test (MWT)

A test to determine a person’s ability to stay awake.

 

Mean Sleep Latency (MSL)

The average value of all sleep latencies measured during the Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT).

 

Medical Sleep Studies

Sleep science, a relatively new field in medicine, encompasses the evaluation, diagnostic procedures and treatments for all kinds of sleep problems. Mid-20th century advances in the understanding of the brain’s electrical activity, coupled with an evolution of sensing technologies, led to routine use of scalp sensors to monitor and record those signals on paper. This procedure is known today as electroencephalography (EEG). Further advances in physiological monitoring have led to a comprehensive picture of body and brain functions during wakefulness and sleep. These measurements now form the core of what is known broadly as the gold standard of sleep evaluation.

Two major technology developments at the end of the 20th century further improved these capabilities: the replacement of paper-based polygraphs with digital models; and miniaturization. Although both advances have enabled ambulatory evaluations, a conservative approach to sleep studies (a bed and stationary measuring devices in a sleep lab) prevails.

Medical sleep studies measure and record many parameters for a later analysis. That data yields information about sleep-wake states, sleep structure (stages of sleep), sleep quality (continuity and efficiency) and sleep disorders. The procedure is done in a dedicated sleep facility or at home, typically over a single night.

The gold standard for medical sleep studies is also known as a whole-night polysomnography (PSG).

A partial sleep study is a less complex alternative.

All sleep studies (including home and ambulatory diagnostic evaluations) should be done under the auspices of an accredited sleep facility.

How Will SleepRate Help You?

Use SleepRate for a few days to identify sleep-wake patterns and to measure sleep duration, efficiency and structure. If those measurements suggest a condition that warrants further investigation, you’ll be prompted to consult a physician for an in-depth sleep evaluation.

Learn more about SleepRate. Or, if you’re ready to purchase a SleepRate package, start here.

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Melatonin

Melatonin is a hormone secreted by the pineal gland, a small structure in the brain that receives input about light and darkness via optic pathways that originate in the eyes. Secretion starts in the late evening, reach a peak around 3-4 am and cease during daylight.

Melatonin is an important factor in the regulation of sleep-wake cycles. It has been used for decades to treat jet lag and other sleep-wake cycle disorders. Although research indicates that melatonin use is beneficial, its efficacy and side effects have not been evaluated in extensive clinical trials because it’s sold as a food supplement as opposed to a medication. Nonetheless, its use is widespread and no one has documented severe side effects.

One must always be aware of possible drug interactions when taking melatonin with medication for other health problems. If you are using other medications, consulting a doctor before taking melatonin is prudent. Melatonin should be purchased from a reputable store and manufacturer to avoid products that may be ineffective or contaminated.

How Will SleepRate Help You?

Use SleepRate for a few days to identify sleep-wake patterns and to measure sleep duration, efficiency and structure. If those measurements suggest a condition that warrants further investigation, you’ll be prompted to consult a physician for an in-depth sleep evaluation. Otherwise, SleepRate will provide you with personalized advice on how to improve your sleep.

Learn more about SleepRate. Or, if you’re ready to purchase a SleepRate package, start here.

FAQ

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Mixed Apnea

An apnea episode that begins as a central apnea event and becomes an obstructive apnea event.

Monthly ViewSleepRate Term*

This screen displays graphs of several sleep scores behavior over a period of one month, making emerging  trends apparent.

Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT)

A test to determine a person’s propensity to fall asleep.

 

My Sleep RatingSleepRate Term*

Your personal rating of the sleep quality when you wake up in the morning.

Nap DurationSleepRate Term*

The reported nap time during the preceding day.

NappingSleepRate Term*

Is napping good or bad? We have internal clocks that motivate us to sleep at night and stay awake during the day. But there is an additional point in the daytime when most people feel sleepy: around 2:00 pm. Our bodies and minds are telling us we need a break, but the demands of modern society compel us to ignore that tendency.

Children typically nap during the day until they reach school age. Of course, there seems to be a time in the evening (7-8 pm) during which children simply refuse to sleep. Yet that behavior is consistent with an internal sleep-wake rhythm.

A nap for additional rest or relaxation is useful if one feels the need. It can improve alertness and performance, if not mood as well. The downside might be post-nap grogginess or difficulty falling asleep in the evenings. Napping may be a good strategy for someone who is sleepy, provided the duration is limited to roughly 30 minutes.

If one feels an irresistible need to sleep during the day or has a tendency to fall asleep during inappropriate moments (while driving, during lectures, in the theater), a visit to a physician to check for sleep or medical disorders is prudent.

How Will SleepRate Help You?

Use SleepRate for a few days to identify sleep-wake patterns and to measure sleep duration, efficiency and structure. If those measurements suggest a condition that warrants further investigation, you’ll be prompted to consult a physician for an in-depth sleep evaluation. Otherwise, SleepRate will provide you with personalized advice on how to improve your sleep.

Learn more about SleepRate. Or, if you’re ready to purchase a SleepRate package, start here.

SleepRate Home Page

 

Night Owl / Delayed Sleep Phase Syndrome/ DSPSSleepRate Term*

A tendency to delay falling asleep and to wake up late, relative to conventional schedules and personal daily obligations. Otherwise, Sleep structure is normal.

Night Relaxation IndexSleepRate Term*

The relaxation index provides a measure of how much your mind and body are relaxed and calm, which is the optimal state for healthy sleep. This is an individual measure. Its values range between 0 and 100, with higher values indicating deeper relaxation.

Night Stress IndexSleepRate Term*

A measure of the overall stress tracked during your nighttime recording. This is an individually determined score that may change, with higher values indicating higher stress.

Nightmare

An unpleasant or frightening dream that usually occurs in REM sleep.

 

Number of AwakeningsSleepRate Term*

The number of transitions from sleep to wakefulness, lasting more than 15 seconds.

Obstructive Apnea

Apnea with no airflow through the mouth and nose in spite of persistent respiratory effort.

Over-the-Counter Sleeping Aids

People frequently use over-the-counter (OTC) sleep medications when they have difficulty falling asleep. Those medications can be useful when taken occasionally, but ongoing sleep challenges require an adherence to healthy sleep habits rather than the long-term use of medication.

Many OTC medications are available for sleep. Most are antihistamines (e.g., Benadryl, Unisom). Their sedative properties are actually a side effect of medications originally intended for control of hay fever and other allergies. Unwanted side effects may include daytime drowsiness, dry mouth, dizziness and memory problems.

A plant extract such as valerian may also be used. Its efficacy varies by individual, but sometimes it works well as a sleep aid. Unwanted side effects may include irritability, abdominal discomfort and cardiac problems.

Melatonin, a naturally occurring hormone that regulates sleep-wake cycles, is used often as an OTC sedative.

How Will SleepRate Help You?

Use SleepRate for a few days to identify sleep-wake patterns and to measure sleep duration, efficiency and structure. It will provide you with personalized advice on how to improve your sleep.

Learn more about SleepRate. Or, if you’re ready to purchase a SleepRate package, start here.

FAQ

FAQ

Parasomnia

Abnormal behaviors usually associated with sleep. Examples are sleepwalking, sleep talking, night terrors and REM sleep behavioral disorder.

Parasomnias

Unusual nighttime events such as night terrors, sleep talking, or sleepwalking are known as parasomnias. They are mostly harmless, always intriguing, occasionally humorous and often scary. For sleep scientists they represent a very interesting series of naturally-occurring experiments at the boundaries between human states: wakefulness, non-REM sleep and REM sleep. These weird amalgams and overlaps of states cannot always be explained, but they reveal aspects of sleep that could not otherwise be observed.

Non-REM (or Arousal) Parasomnias

Night terrors, sleep talking, and sleepwalking originate in deep sleep, usually during the first third of the night. They occur more frequently in childhood and decrease with age, though a small percentage of adults still experience these events. There appears to be a genetic link to the phenomenon; and scientists have never found an underlying pathology. Treatment is typically not needed unless the episodes are frequent and interfere with the night routines of people who sleep in the vicinity.

In some cases, an overnight sleep study may be prudent to rule out epileptic seizures at night.

As a practical matter, the sleeping environment for someone who experiences parasomnias must be prepared in such a way as to prevent physical injury during episodes – essentially “parasomnia-proofed”, for lack of a better term.

Children experience night terrors frequently, as many parents well know. They scream, cry, become agitated and frightened, and are inconsolable. Any attempt to wake or comfort them makes things worse. There is no actual disruption of sleep; and they retain no memories of dreamlike experiences when they wake at the end of an episode. They may, however, feel and express fear without a specific reason.

Sleep talking and sleepwalking involve complex motor behavior, but represent two extremes on the activity continuum. Talking obviously involves relatively little movement; but sleepwalking is a very agitated state. In spite of that, sleepwalkers rarely leave their abodes. They retain no memory of the event; and there is no disruption of sleep. Treatment is not required for infrequent episodes, but the sleep environment must be made safe.

Episodes start in late childhood and typically stop by the late teens. For an unfortunate few, the episodes persist into adulthood.

REM Sleep Parasomnias

Nightmares are simply bad dreams. They occur mostly in the last part of the night when REM sleep predominates, whereas sleep terrors intrude into the first part of the night. When people wake after a nightmare they can provide a detailed report of the frightful experience.

Sleep paralysis occurs when one wakes up suddenly from REM sleep but is unable to move because REM-related muscle inhibition is still in place temporarily. Though frightening, it’s a harmless phenomenon. The problem may occur sporadically without a known cause; or it may recur within family clusters. In many cases it’s an isolated event, but it can also occur as a symptom of narcolepsy.

REM behavioral disorder presents with agitated motor activity during REM sleep that can put sufferers or their bed partners at risk for injury. This happens when normal muscle inactivation during REM sleep disappears, thus causing apparent violent behavior while sleeping. An overnight sleep study can diagnose the disorder easily. An underlying brain or neurological problem causes this, and sometimes precedes Parkinson’s disease by many years.

How Will SleepRate Help You?

If you don’t have a medical sleep disorder, but feel tired during the day or perceive your sleep isn’t refreshing, use SleepRate for a few days to identify sleep-wake patterns and to measure sleep duration, efficiency and structure. It will provide you with personalized advice on how to improve your sleep.

Learn more about SleepRate. Or, if you’re ready to purchase a SleepRate package, start here.

Sleep Science Table of Contents

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Partial Sleep Studies

A partial sleep study is a limited version of a whole-night polysomnography (PSG), the gold standard for clinical sleep evaluation. The differences in the subset are:

  • It has relatively few monitoring channels; and those are devoted to respiratory functions.
  • It can be done outside of a sleep lab (in other words, at home).

 

The focus on respiratory functions makes it ideal for diagnosing sleep-related breathing disorders.

It’s also a less expensive diagnostic procedure and the data it generates is much easier to score than data produced by a whole-night PSG. A trend towards greater use of partial sleep studies is underway, though it cannot always replace a full PSG, especially if sleep problems are more complex or not caused only by respiratory disorders.

In the future, technologies that measure sleep directly will enable other kinds of partial sleep studies. For example, measurements of heart rate fluctuations with portable equipment provide a window into the sleeping brain. Such a technology could supplement others to provide a more comprehensive analysis of sleep outside a lab environment.

How Will SleepRate Help You?

Use SleepRate for a few days to identify sleep-wake patterns and to measure sleep duration, efficiency and structure. If those measurements suggest a condition that warrants further investigation, you’ll be prompted to consult a physician for an in-depth sleep evaluation.

Find out more about SleepRate. Or, if you’re ready to purchase a SleepRate package, start here.

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Periodic Leg (limb) Movement of Sleep (PLMS)

Brief, recurrent and periodic movements of legs and arms during sleep such as foot extensions, big toe extensions or partial flexions at the hip or knee.

Prescription Sleep Medication

Many people have problems falling asleep or staying asleep. Approximately 10% of the general population suffers chronic problems and 30-50% had sleep issues at some point in their lives. If the difficulties are not connected to an underlying health problem (e.g., obstructive sleep apnea, mood disorders), the best approach is to follow the rules of good sleep hygiene. They include, among other things, adhering to a regular sleep schedule.

Sometimes the short term use of a sleep medication prescribed by physician – preferably a sleep expert – can help.

Your physician will ask you some background questions about your habits and overall health. Under some circumstances, he/she may order tests to rule out underlying medical conditions that could disturb sleep. Assuming none are found, he/she may prescribe an appropriate sleep medication for not more than two weeks. Additional steps may be needed to alleviate the problem(s).

There are several categories of prescription sleep medication, among them sedatives, anxiolytics and antidepressants. An experienced and knowledgeable clinician will make the best choice for a patient. Sleep medications carry the risk of increasing dependence and tolerance when used over long periods of time. Although newer compounds have fewer such risks, they can cause liver and kidney problems, mood changes and other adverse effects.

How Will SleepRate Help You?

Use SleepRate for a few days to identify sleep-wake patterns and to measure sleep duration, efficiency and structure. It will provide you with personalized advice on how to improve your sleep as well as useful information you should share with your physician during your consultation.

Find out more about SleepRate. Or, if you’re ready to purchase a SleepRate package, start here.

FAQ

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QualitySleepRate Term*

How well you slept, based on the duration of time spent asleep as a percentage of the total time spent in bed at night, and on the continuity of your sleep.

REM Latency

The elapsed time from sleep onset to the first REM sleep occurrence.

 

REM SleepSleepRate Term*

The percentage REM sleep between failing asleep and waking up times.

Respiratory Disturbance Index (RDI)

The average number of abnormal respiratory events per hour of recording.

 

Respiratory Sleep Disorders

A person’s breathing control while awake is both automatic and voluntary. During sleep the voluntary mechanism disappears and respiration is on “autopilot”. At the same time, the absence of wake-state stimuli, normal reduction in muscle tone and reduced lung volume in a recumbent position create conditions that can contribute to sleep-related respiratory disturbances. Normal respiration patterns differ depending on the sleep stage: They are very regular during stages of non-REM deep sleep, but can be irregular during sleep onset and REM sleep.

Normal breathing during sleep should be relatively quiet. This means that fresh air enters the lungs without impediments several times per minute, thus maintaining the body’s metabolic requirements during sleep.

Loud respiratory noise during sleep may indicate the presence of a respiratory disorder. The first clue that something might be wrong is snoring during sleep. This may signal a temporary narrowing or blockage of the upper airways due to relaxation of the airway muscles and pressure from surrounding tissue while in a recumbent position. This narrowing leads to a reduction of air inflow to the lungs called sleep hypopnea, while a complete blockage of those airways is called sleep apnea. Frequently both are described as a single condition called obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome.

Snoring is always due to some degree of narrowing in the upper airways, but it doesn’t necessarily indicate full-blown obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome. But a person who snores should, without question, follow up with a physician due to possible health risks.

Another less common breathing problem is known as central sleep apnea. This condition is characterized by a temporary, sometimes cyclic lack of respiratory drive that indicates an absence of proper signaling from the brain to the respiratory system. During sleep, the body “forgets” to breathe for abnormally long periods of time, resulting in irregular respiration.

These disorders interfere with sleep quality and cause daytime sleepiness, performance issues and serious health problems such as hypertension, cardiovascular issues or strokes. Fortunately, effective treatments are available from medical professionals that can improve, to a large degree, a sufferer’s quality of life.

How Will SleepRate Help You?

Use SleepRate for a few days to identify sleep-wake patterns and to measure sleep duration, efficiency and structure. If those measurements suggest a condition that warrants further investigation, you’ll be prompted to consult a physician for an in-depth sleep evaluation.

Find out more about SleepRate. Or, if you’re ready to purchase a SleepRate package, start here.

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Restless Leg Syndrome

Restless leg syndrome is a sleep disorder in which there is an urge or need to move the legs to stop unpleasant tinglings, creeping, crawling sensations in the lower legs, usually between the knee and the ankle which is relieved when legs are moved. These sensation can last for more than an hour and can cause insomnia.

 

Sleep ArchitectureSleepRate Term*

The sequence of sleep cycles and the relative amounts of sleep spent in different stages during an overnight sleep.

Sleep Architecture

The timing of sleep cycles and the relative amounts of sleep in different stages during an overnight sleep.

 

Sleep AssessmentSleepRate Term*

Track your sleep for at least 6 out of 7 nights, to allow SleepRate to gather baseline information of your sleep. Once this information is received and processed, you will get your sleep assessment report, and a personally tailored sleep improvement plan, if needed.

Sleep Continuity

Sleep with no interruptions from arousals or awakenings.

 

Sleep Cycles

Typical late-evening routines that end with sleep usually begin with a tired feeling and a habitual unwinding of daily activities and emotions. Assuming the presence of a comfortable bed and environment, most people fall asleep within 20 minutes.

The initial sleep phase sequence is as follows.

  • a relatively short period of non-REM light sleep
  • a relatively long period of non-REM deep sleep
  • a relatively short period (again) of non-REM light sleep
  • a very short period of REM sleep

Then the sequence restarts, sometimes after a very short transition to wakefulness. The sequence repeats 4 to 5 times during the night before the final morning wakeup. A single sequence, known as a sleep cycle, may last from 90 to 120 minutes.

The relative proportion of non-REM and REM sleep changes as the night progresses. Deep non-REM sleep predominates initially, but by the end of the night extended periods of REM sleep prevail. Non-REM sleep during the second half of the night is mostly light, mainly non-REM stage 2.

How Will SleepRate Help You?

Use SleepRate for a few days to identify sleep-wake patterns and to measure sleep duration, efficiency and structure. If those measurements suggest a condition that warrants further investigation, you’ll be prompted to consult a physician for an in-depth sleep evaluation.

Find out more about SleepRate. Or, if you’re ready to purchase a SleepRate package, start here.

FAQ

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Sleep Deprivation

Sleep Deprivation

The average need for sleep has remained unchanged throughout modern human existence. But technological advances throughout the last century (especially artificial light) have slowly eroded the duration of our nighttime rest. The recent revolution in computing, communications and media has further eroded average sleep time. An “always on” culture has permeated traditional barriers between work time, family time, playtime and rest. We often struggle to meet an unnatural (and occasionally unrealistic) expansion of obligations.

In the meantime, our need for sleep hasn’t changed. So what’s the impact?

In simplistic terms, we’re sleepier during the day than we should be because we’re carrying sleep debts or adding to them faster than ever before. Sleeping late on the weekends may seem to help, but in fact it’s only paying interest on the obligation, so to speak. The overall impact of daytime sleepiness and reduced energy levels is corrosive. They often cause:

Insufficient sleep impacts normal physiological rhythms such as appetite and hunger. This may cause people to eat at times when they would otherwise not do so, and possibly eat more than they should. The resulting disruption to normal metabolic and hormonal balances often causes weight gain. This is a scientific fact, not just coincidental. That’s why obesity and sleep deprivation are together the two biggest public health epidemics in western societies.

The overall cost to society of insufficient sleep is high, whether measured in personal or macroeconomic terms.

How Will SleepRate Help You?

SleepRate measures and reports the quantity and quality of sleep you receive. If you feel you aren’t getting enough restorative sleep, SleepRate will make personalized recommendations to help you sleep better. If SleepRate suspects that a medical condition is impacting your sleep, it will recommend a visit to a physician.

Find out more about SleepRate. Or, if you’re ready to purchase a SleepRate package, start here.

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Sleep Deprivation

The average need for sleep has remained unchanged throughout modern human existence. But technological advances throughout the last century (especially artificial light) have slowly eroded the duration of our nighttime rest. The recent revolution in computing, communications and media has further eroded average sleep time. An “always on” culture has permeated traditional barriers between work time, family time, playtime and rest. We often struggle to meet an unnatural (and occasionally unrealistic) expansion of obligations.

In the meantime, our need for sleep hasn’t changed. So what’s the impact?

In simplistic terms, we’re sleepier during the day than we should be because we’re carrying sleep debts or adding to them faster than ever before. Sleeping late on the weekends may seem to help, but in fact it’s only paying interest on the obligation, so to speak. The overall impact of daytime sleepiness and reduced energy levels is corrosive. They often cause:

  • low productivity
  • poor performance at school or work
  • high stress and anxiety
  • mood disorders
  • accidents
  • other medical issues

 

Insufficient sleep impacts normal physiological rhythms such as appetite and hunger. This may cause people to eat at times when they would otherwise not do so, and possibly eat more than they should. The resulting disruption to normal metabolic and hormonal balances often causes weight gain. This is a scientific fact, not just coincidental. That’s why obesity and sleep deprivation are together the two biggest public health epidemics in western societies.

The overall cost to society of insufficient sleep is high, whether measured in personal or macroeconomic terms.

How Will SleepRate Help You?

Use SleepRate for a few days to identify sleep-wake patterns and to measure sleep duration, efficiency and structure. If those measurements suggest a condition that warrants further investigation, you’ll be prompted to consult a physician for an in-depth sleep evaluation. Otherwise, SleepRate will provide you with personalized advice on how to improve your sleep.

Find out more about SleepRate. Or, if you’re ready to purchase a SleepRate package, start here.

Sleep Disorders

Nothing feels better than a solid night of refreshing sleep. Good rest underpins the quality of our lives. Those who are fortunate enough to experience enough peaceful slumber each night don’t realize that its absence has profound negative consequences. The lack of good sleep adversely impacts physical health, mood and performance. Sleep science – a relatively new branch of medicine – was created to understand and treat physical and mental disorders that interfere with sleep.

Sleep disorders can be categorized broadly in one of two ways: medical conditions that originate within sleep; and illnesses and afflictions that originate outside of sleep and cause sleep disruptions. Examples of the latter category are toothaches, arthritis and depression. Disorders in the first category are more difficult to recognize without medical expertise and the use of specialized methods and tools.

The importance of consulting a physician early cannot be overemphasized because many symptoms are common to both sleep disorders and non-sleep ailments. All sleep disorders manifest themselves via one or more of these debilitating symptoms: daytime sleepiness, inability to wake when required, poor performance on cognitive tasks, or inexplicable weight gain over time (to name just a few).

Every person should understand the basics of sleep disorders in the same way we understand well-known conditions such as diabetes, cancer and heart disease. The health risks from insufficient or poor quality sleep are as serious as those of other major diseases.

Sleep disorders may be classified within these subgroups:

  • sleep-related respiratory disorders
  • insomnia
  • circadian rhythm sleep disorders
  • neurological sleep disorders
  • parasomnias
  • miscellaneous sleep disorders

Multiple disorders are often present at the same time because some conditions create a susceptibility to others. The supervision of a physician is always required to diagnose and treat disorders that have an underlying medical cause.

How Will SleepRate Help You?

Use SleepRate for a few days to identify sleep-wake patterns and to measure sleep duration, efficiency and structure. If those measurements suggest a condition that warrants further investigation, you’ll be prompted to consult a physician for an in-depth sleep evaluation. Otherwise, SleepRate will provide you with personalized advice on how to improve your sleep.

Find out more about SleepRate. Or, if you’re ready to purchase a SleepRate package, start here.

SleepRate Home Page

 

Sleep EfficiencySleepRate Term*

The percentage of time spent asleep out of the total time in bed.

Sleep Efficiency

The percentage of time asleep out of the total time in bed. Also can be defined as the percentage of time spent asleep after sleep onset (i.e., sleep efficiency after sleep onset).

Sleep Facility

A sleep facility can be as simple as a normal doctor’s office where sleep physicians consult with patients; or it can be a dedicated center with a sleep laboratory staffed with sleep physicians, psychologists and sleep technicians.

A laboratory typically has a number of bedrooms, each equipped with devices and recorders that capture the physiological signals required to complete a gold-standard sleep study. Additional equipment will record behaviors, noise, snoring and so forth. A central control room allows skilled technicians to monitor simultaneous overnight tests of patients in the bedrooms.

When a patient arrives at the laboratory before his/her normal bedtime, the night technician goes through a standard routine of attaching various types of sensors to the patient’s body. Patients then go to sleep at their usual bedtime and are awakened in the morning by the technician, who then removes the sensors.

A sleep technician scores the raw data immediately after the test. A sleep physician reviews the result, and then interprets the data with clinical information collected before the test.

Accredited sleep centers offer the following services:

 

 

How Will SleepRate Help You?

Use SleepRate for a few days to identify sleep-wake patterns and to measure sleep duration, efficiency and structure. If those measurements suggest a condition that warrants further investigation, you’ll be prompted to consult a physician for an in-depth sleep evaluation.

 

Sleep Fragmentation

Repetitive sleep interruptions from arousals and awakenings.

 

Sleep Hygiene

Hygiene is defined as the practice of keeping yourself and the things around you clean, in order to prevent illness and disease.
During more than two decades already, sleep physicians use the term Sleep Hygiene to describe a bunch of measures patients with sleep problems can use to improve their sleep. These measures, when implemented, can also prevent sleep issues from interfering with daily life.

Check your sleep environment and make necessary changes so that:

  • Your bed is comfortable
  • The temperature is comfortable
  • Air quality is good
  • Noise level is acceptable
  • Shades: natural morning light should be a trigger to wake up. Thus, if you have a tendency to wake up late, leave shades open when you go to sleep
  • TV should be kept out of the bedroom

 

If you want to fall asleep easier, think about

  • How many caffeinated drinks, and other substances that keep you awake, you have taken and at what times during the day
  • Do you smoke, do you smoke before bedtime? Consider avoiding this, since nicotine has an arousing effect
  • When and at what intensity do you exercise/jog/run. Good exercise improves sleep and increases the amount of deep sleep, and this facilitates physical recovery. However, high intensity exercise close to bed time may delay your falling asleep.
  • Consider some relaxation strategies before sleep. Learn how to unwind at the end of the day
  • Do not use alcohol to ease your falling asleep. Indeed you may shorten the time it takes you to enter sleep, however your sleep quality may be jeopardized and your sleep will be less efficient and more fragmented
  • What about meals? Do not go to sleep when hungry or after a heavy meal
  • Go to bed only when you are ready to sleep
  • Do not nap during the day

 

If you wake up very early in the morning, when you can afford to sleep more, but you can’t continue sleeping:

  • Find out if something in the environment causes this: noise, light, temperature, children, pets. If so, try to change and see how it works
  • Is your mood low lately? Consider talking about this with your physician

 

If you have problems falling asleep at regular hours and have no problems when you go to sleep very late; your sleep seems fine and you have to wake up for the days duties, and that might be difficult; please understand that your behavior makes you sleep deprived, always late or lacking patience, nervous, irritable . So

  • Decide when you need to get up in the morning in order to deal with your school/work
  • Wake up regularly at that time, with not more than 30 min delay on free days
  • Determine the amount of time you need to sleep, at least 7 hours, and that will indicate the time you should get to bed and sleep.
  • Allow yourself enough sleep time
  • Do not nap during the day
  • Use natural morning light to synchronize your internal clock

How can SleepRate Help?

SleepRate technology enables the assessment of sleep structure and patterns, in the context of the bedroom environment
SleepRate helps changing habits and sleep environment to allow better sleep.

Sleep Hygiene

Conditions and habits that promote continuous and efficient sleep.

 

Sleep Improvement PlanSleepRate Term*

The SleepRate app will guide you through a series of step by step, sleep improvement goals, at your own pace, on a path to better sleep and wellbeing.

Sleep Latency

The elapsed time from the start of a sleep session (e.g., bedtime) to the first 30 seconds of sleep. The measurement presumes no lasting sleep beyond those 30 seconds.

 

Sleep Latency to Stable Sleep

The elapsed time from the start of a sleep session (e.g., bedtime) to the beginning of continuous sleep (defined as at least 10 minutes of uninterrupted sleep).

Sleep Medication

Over the counter sleeping aids

Many people use over the counter sleeping aids when having difficulties falling asleep.

Such sleeping aids may be used occasionally, but on a regular basis it is preferable to stick to healthy sleep habits, rather than use any medication.
There are many over the counter medications. Most are antihistamines (like Benadryl, Unisom) and their sedative effect is actually a side effect of a medication aimed originally as an anti-allergy one. Thus, they can cause daytime drowsiness, dry mouth, dizziness and memory problems.
In addition, plant extracts such as Valerian may be used. Their influence differs individually, sometimes they help falling asleep, but they also can cause irritability, abdominal discomfort, and cardiac issues.

Melatonin, a naturally occurring hormone related to the normal regulation of the sleep-wake cycle is also used as an over the counter sedative.

Prescription Sleeping Pills

Falling asleep difficulties and/or difficulties to maintain sleep across the night are very frequent. About 10% of the general population suffers from chronic sleep problems and as many as 30-50% of people have at some time or another in their lives sleep related concerns. The healthy way to deal with these problems, if they are not connected to an underlying health problem such as Obstructive Sleep Apnea or a mood disorder, is to try and adhere to a regular sleep schedule, and implement all sleep hygiene requirements. Sometimes, one can use for a short time a sleeping pill, provided it is prescribed by a physician, preferably a sleep expert.

When asking a physician to help you sleep better, fall asleep faster or stay asleep for an entire night, the doctor will make some inquiries regarding your general health as well as your sleep habits and changes in lifestyle or distressing vents. When needed, some tests may be ordered to rule out any underling medical cause to the sleep disturbance. Then a suitable sleep medication may be prescribed for a period of around two weeks. Additional steps may be needed to improve sleep.

Sleeping pills in general carry the risk of developing dependence and tolerance when used over prolonged periods of time. Newer compounds have less such effects, but they can cause liver or kidney problems as well as mood changes, and more.

Melatonin

Melatonin is a hormone secreted by the pineal gland, a small structure in our brains that receives its input regarding light and dark in the environment via the optic pathways originating in the eyes. The secretion starts in the late evening, is maximal around 3-4 am, and is suppressed during daylight. Melatonin is a factor in the sleep-wake cycle regulation.

It has been used for decades as an aid in treating jet lag and other sleep-wake cycle disorders. Research indicates that its use is beneficial. However, since in the US melatonin is sold as a food additive, its efficiency and side effects have not been checked in extensive clinical trials. Its usage is broad and no severe side effecthave been documented. One has to be aware of possible drug interaction that may exist. When having any health problem that requires medication, it is advised to consult a doctor before taking Melatonin. It is recommended to purchase a product of a known lab to avoid using ineffective or contaminated Melatonin.

How can SleepRate help?

SleepRate is able to detect sleep schedule patterns and sleep structure. Based on these measurements, SleepRate can recommend how to make changes to improve sleep and reduce the need for sleeping aids/pills/medication.

Sleep Onset

The moment of falling asleep, but can differ according to the specific sleep parameter. For example, behaviors, movement, cognition, electrical activity of the brain and muscle tone are distinct measurements which may not coincide.

Sleep Regulation

Two fundamental processes work to regulate sleep and wakefulness: the homeostatic sleep drive (known as process S) and the circadian rhythm (known as process C). Together they maintain a continuous dynamic balance between sleep and wake states.

After a morning wakeup – assuming sleep needs are fulfilled – one is typically alert and ready to take on the new day. As the day progresses, process S (the sleep drive) accumulates a sleep need; and by the evening an average person is ready to sleep again. Sleep deprivation increases one’s propensity to fall asleep and spend more time in deep sleep. On the other hand, process C (the circadian rhythm) is independent of previous amounts of sleep and works according to a timer set by an inner clock. It does, however, affect the timing and duration of REM sleep.

Other factors also influence the propensity to sleep or stay awake: motivation, age, environmental cues and social cues.

How Will SleepRate Help You?

SleepRate measures and reports the duration and efficiency of sleep you receive. If you suspect you aren’t getting enough sleep or the right kinds of sleep, the SleepRate can provide you with a detailed analysis and, if needed, guidance on how to improve your sleep.

Find out more about SleepRate. Or, if you’re ready to purchase a SleepRate package, start here.

SleepRate Home Page

 

Sleep Stages

To understand the nature of sleep and its stages, it’s important to understand the difference between sleep and wakefulness. Being awake is a state of consciousness accompanied by heightened perception, realistic thinking, environmental responsiveness and physical activity. In contrast, sleep is a behavioral state of decreased perception, relatively low responsiveness to the environment and physical inactivity (or rest).

A quiescent body is the most obvious characteristic of sleep, but the brain remains active at varying levels while regulating sleep and performing vital tasks. Indeed, during certain phases of sleep, the brain is more active than during wakefulness.

There are two fundamental sleep states: REM (rapid eye movement) sleep and non-REM sleep. Each is regulated by a different part of the brain; and the difference between those states is as profound as the difference between sleep and wakefulness. REM sleep is regulated from the brainstem, whereas non-REM sleep is regulated from higher brain centers.

As a practical matter, scientists differentiate between the three states (wakefulness, non-REM sleep and REM sleep) by measuring

  • electrical activity in the brain via electroencephalography (EEG)
  • eye movements via electrooculography (EOG)
  • muscle activity via electromyography (EMG)

 

The following are more precise descriptions of the behavioral and physiological changes across these states.

Wakefulness

A waking state may be quiet, physically active or mental active.

Non-REM Sleep

Non-REM sleep has three stages (1, 2 and 3) which are differentiated by their degrees of sensory and motor disconnects from the environment. The magnitude of those disconnects is otherwise known as sleep depth. (Stage 3 is the deepest.) Increasing depth means

  • slowing, mostly homogenous electrical activity in the brain
  • decreased slow-rolling eye movements (ceasing completely in stages 2 and 3)
  • decreased muscle activity (though movement is always possible)
  • decreased respiration and heart rate, but increasing regularity
  • decreased oxygen consumption
  • growth hormone secretion (stage 3)
  • decreased sensitivity of pain receptors
  • stable body temperature control
  • realistic and analytical thought processes (similar to wakefulness)

 

REM Sleep

REM sleep is characterized by varying levels of sensory disconnection from the environment and an inability to move. The important characteristics are

  • rapid and heterogeneous electrical activity within the brain (similar to that of wakefulness)
  • inhibition of voluntary muscles leading to near-paralysis with some irregular twitches
  • rapid eye movements similar to those of wakefulness
  • decreased control of body temperature
  • faster and irregular heart rate and respiration (relative to non-REM sleep)
  • penile tumescence
  • increased oxygen consumption
  • hyper-associative dreaming with bizarre thoughts

 

Although the three states (wakefulness, non-REM sleep and REM sleep) have very distinct physiological characteristics, there may be overlap under certain circumstances. For example, sleepwalking occurs mostly during non-REM deep sleep and presents a behavioral characteristic that is normally associated with wakefulness.

Every human is in one of these three states at any given time. On average, adults are awake for 2/3 of the 24-hour day and asleep for the other 1/3. When sleeping, the relative proportions of sleep states are roughly

  • 50% in light non-REM sleep
  • 20-25% in deep non-REM sleep
  • 20-25% in REM sleep

 

An amazing statistic: In a 90-year lifespan, a person will probably have slept for 30 years and will have spent 10 years dreaming!

How Will SleepRate Help You?

Use SleepRate for a few days to identify sleep-wake patterns and to measure sleep duration, efficiency and structure. If those measurements suggest a condition that warrants further investigation, you’ll be prompted to consult a physician for an in-depth sleep evaluation. Otherwise, SleepRate will provide you with personalized advice on how to improve your sleep.

Find out more about SleepRate. Or, if you’re ready to purchase a SleepRate package, start here.

SleepRate Home Page

 

Sleep Terrors

A parasomnia that starts as a partial awakening from deep non-REM sleep. It’s characterized by crying, screaming, confusion, fear or autonomic hyperactivity.

Sleep Tracking PlanSleepRate Term*

In the basic service you can track your nights using the app and track you sleep session results.

Sleepwalking (somnambulism)

A parasomnia that starts as a partial awakening from deep non-REM sleep. It’s characterized by complex motor activity such as walking.

Smart AlarmSleepRate Term*

This feature provides a flexible wake up time (within a 20 minute window) to ensure that you wake up at the optimal moment during your sleep cycle.

Snoring

A narrowing of the airways during sleep may cause airflow turbulence and soft palate vibration that result in snoring. More than a quarter of the population snores occasionally or habitually; and it’s usually worse while supine. It can of course be very annoying for bed partners.

Sometimes snoring has no medical implications and does not impact the sleep quality of the person who snores. (On the other hand, bed partners may suffer serious sleep disruptions). This is known as primary snoring. Snoring can also be a first sign of obstructive sleep apnea. It may be treatable after determining that it is not associated with apnea.

You should see your doctor about snoring if you experience any of the following symptoms:

  • You wake up suddenly while gasping or snorting; and fall back asleep instantaneously.
  • Your snoring is so loud that it annoys your bed partner and he/she can’t sleep.
  • Your mouth or throat is dry and painful at night.
  • You wake up in the morning and feel your sleep was not refreshing.

 

 

How Will SleepRate Help You?

Use SleepRate for a few days to identify sleep-wake patterns and to measure sleep duration, efficiency, structure and snoring. If those measurements suggest a condition that warrants further investigation, you’ll be prompted to consult a physician for an in-depth sleep evaluation. Otherwise, SleepRate will provide you with personalized advice on how to improve your sleep.

Learn more about SleepRate. Or, if you

Snoring EventsSleepRate Term*

Recording of snoring episodes detected during the night. Duration and level of snore – recording

Total Time in BedSleepRate Term*

The time between going to bed at night and getting up in the morning.

WakeSleepRate Term*

The percentage of awake time during the night. This includes the time it took to fall asleep and time spent awake during the night.

Weekly ViewSleepRate Term*

This screen displays graphs of specific sleep scores over a period of one week, so trends may emerge.

Whole-Night Polysomnography

The gold standard of sleep diagnostic procedures is known as a whole-night polysomnography (PSG). It consists of an overnight stay in a medical facility with a supervising technician who oversees a suite of monitoring mechanisms. A sleep technology expert scores the data offline and a sleep physician interprets the results. In spite of the high cost and the amount of work needed for such a study, the results maybe not be representative of a typical night’s sleep at home.

A representative test requires sleeping in one’s own bed with familiar routines and schedules. That’s of course not possible in a sleep facility. The full lab-based polysomnography should be reserved for sleep disorders that cannot be detected with a partial home study or with other objective methods that allow a patient to remain in his/her normal sleep environment.

A whole-night PSG typically records the following:

  • Signals that enable the evaluation of sleep architecture and quality
    • 6 electroencephalography (EEG) channels (at a minimum)
    • 2 electrooculography (EOG) eye movement channels
    • 1 electromyography (EMG) chin muscle activity channel
  • Signals that enable the evaluation of respiration during sleep
    • mouth and nose airflow
    • nasal pressure
    • chest and abdominal movement (2 channels)
    • oxygen saturation
    • snoring
    • body position
  • Signals that enable the evaluation of limb movements
    • 1-4 EMG channels for muscle activity
  • Other
    • 1-2 electrocardiogram (ECG) channels for heart electrical activity

 

The attending lab technician monitors these recordings overnight and corrects problems with signal quality or disconnections.

A sleep technology expert scores the study afterwards. This is a manual process, though some computerized tools can make the job easier and faster. But overall, whole-night polysomnography is burdensome and expensive; and the scoring process is costly and complicated. As well, there have always been some concerns about recording quality variability and differences in skill levels across sleep technology experts.

Partial sleep studies at home that are administered by sleep clinics seem to be a superior alternative for cost and efficiency reasons. The use of partial sleep studies is increasing, though important quality and reimbursement issues must first be resolved.

 

How Will SleepRate Help You?

Use SleepRate for a few days to identify sleep-wake patterns and to measure sleep duration, efficiency and structure. If those measurements suggest a condition that warrants further investigation, you’ll be prompted to consult a physician for an in-depth sleep evaluation.

Woke You UpSleepRate Term*

Recordings of sound or noise episodes that were connected with awakening from sleep during the night.